Ah Are You Digging On My Grave Analysis

Ah, Are You Digging My Grave? is a poem by Thomas Hardy. It was first published in Poems of the Past and the Present in 1901.

The poem reflects on the speaker’s impending death, and their thoughts on what will happen to their body after they die. The speaker asks the grave-digger if he is digging their grave, and if so, how deep it will be. They wonder if their body will decompose in the ground, or if they will be remembered by future generations.

The poem ends with the speaker questioning whether they will have a peaceful death, or if they will suffer in the afterlife. Regardless of what happens, the speaker knows that death is inevitable and that they must face it.

Ah, Are You Digging My Grave? is a reflective and somber poem that speaks to the human condition. It is a reminder that death is a part of life, and that everyone must confront it eventually.

Thomas Hardy was an English novelist and poet who wrote during the Victorian era. He is best known for his novels Tess of the d’Urbervilles and Far from the Madding Crowd. However, Hardy also wrote many poems throughout his career.

Thomas Hardy’s “Ah, Are You Digging On My Grave?” has six standard stanzas of six lines, each one written in sequence. The syllables in the lines tend to be eight in number. In addition to the second and last stanza, all but the first and final have six syllable second and last lines. The rhyme scheme is consistent: the second and last lines rhyme, while the three lines between them rhyme with each other.

The speaker in the poem is addressing someone who is digging a grave, and they express their curiosity about who it is and why they are doing it. In the first stanza, the speaker asks if the person digging the grave is doing so for them, and they say that they hope it isn’t because they are not ready to die yet.

The second stanza has the speaker asking if the person dug the grave for someone else, and they say that they hope it isn’t because they don’t want to see anyone else die. In the third stanza, the speaker asks if the person dug the grave for themselves, and they say that they hope it isn’t because they don’t want to die yet.

The fourth stanza has the speaker asking if the person dug the grave for a friend, and they say that they hope it isn’t because they don’t want to see their friend die. In the fifth stanza, the speaker asks if the person dug the grave for a loved one, and they say that they hope it isn’t because they don’t want to see their loved one die. The sixth and final stanza has the speaker asking if the person dug the grave for someone who is unknown to them, and they say that they hope it isn’t because they don’t want to see anyone die.

The poem is about death, and how everyone has their own view on it. Some people are scared of dying, some people are ready to die, and some people don’t want to see their loved ones die. The speaker in the poem is asking all of these questions, and they hope that the person digging the grave isn’t doing so for any of those reasons. In the end, the speaker doesn’t want to see anyone die, regardless of who it is.

Hardy’s meter in this poem is very irregular, which likely was inspired by the folk music of his era. Another musical element of this poem is that there is a refrain: “Ah, Are You Digging On My Grave?” In the second line, when the woman asks if the one digging could be her “loved one? – planting rue?”, ‘rue’ actually is a double entendre. Rue symbolizes sorrow and regret, so the corpse essentially asking her loved whether he plant flowers on her grave out of love or pity.

This poem is about a woman who has died and is speaking to the person digging her grave. She asks him if he is her “loved one” and if he is planting rue on her grave. Rue is a shrub that symbolizes sorrow, so the corpse is really asking her loved one both if he is planting flowers on her grave and if he is feeling sorrow about her death. The meter is very irregular, with accents falling on different syllables.

This quality was possibly inspired by the folk music of Hardy’s time. Another musical quality of this poem is that there is a refrain: “Ah, Are You Digging On My Grave?” In the second line, when the woman asks if the one digging is her “loved one? – planting rue?” the word ‘rue’ is a double entendre. Rue is a shrub that symbolizes sorrow, so the corpse is really asking her loved one both if he is planting flowers on her grave and if he is feeling sorrow about her death. 

The poem begins with the speaker asking if the person digging her grave is her “loved one.” The speaker then asks if the person digging her grave is planting rue on it. Rue is a shrub that symbolizes sorrow. The speaker is asking if the person digging her grave feels sorrow about her death. The poem has an irregular meter. This quality was possibly inspired by the folk music of Hardy’s time. There is also a refrain in the poem. The refrain is “Ah, Are You Digging On My Grave?”

The woman-corpse repeatedly tries to convince herself that her former friends still think about and care for her, even after she has died. However, she consistently realizes that they couldn’t be more wrong–these people don’t give her a second thought now that she is no longer alive. Hardy uses personification by giving the corpse and dog human characteristics such as the ability to communicate and experience emotions.

This technique allows the reader to empathize with the corpse more easily. Hardy also employs irony in this poem. The corpse is worried about how people will remember her, but it turns out that nobody really cares about her at all. This creates a contrast between the woman’s expectations and the reality of her situation.

The title of the poem, “Ah, Are You Digging My Grave,” is also ironic. The woman thinks that someone is digging her grave, but it turns out to be a dog digging for a bone. This highlights the insignificance of her death compared to other things going on in the world.

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