Ain’t No Makin It Summary

Ain’t No Makin’ It is a book about two groups of kids growing up in a housing project. The book follows the kids as they go through their everyday lives, meeting and hanging out with friends, going to school, and working. The book provides a look at the different paths that the kids take, as some end up joining gangs while others stay out of trouble. Ain’t No Makin’ It offers an insight into the lives of kids growing up in poverty, and how they struggle to make something of themselves.

In Ain’t No Makin’ It, we are transported into the world of two separate peer groups in a low-income housing project in America. Jay MacLeod takes us on a journey to show why the attitudes, beliefs, expectations, and aspirations of these two groups of teenagers differ so much despite their commonalities.

The book starts with a brief history of the housing project, which was built in the 1950s. MacLeod then introduces us to the two groups of teenagers he will be following throughout the book: the Hallway Hangers and the Brooks Brothers. The Hallway Hangers are a group of African American boys who spend most of their time hanging out in the hallway of their building. They are considered to be the “bad” kids in the project. The Brooks Brothers are a group of white boys who also spend most of their time in the hallway, but they are considered to be the “good” kids.

MacLeod follows these two groups of teenage boys over a four-year period, from 1974 to 1978. He interviews them regularly and observes their behavior. He also talks to their parents, teachers, and other adults in their lives.

The book is organized into three parts. The first part, “Background,” provides the reader with some important information about the housing project and the two groups of boys. The second part, “The Process,” focuses on how the boys interact with each other and with the adults in their lives. The third part, “The Outcome,” looks at what happened to the boys after they left the housing project.

MacLeod’s book is a fascinating look at how two groups of teenagers can have such different attitudes, beliefs, and expectations despite coming from similar backgrounds. It is an important book for anyone interested in sociology, education, or poverty.

The focus of the exhibit is on education, with a particular emphasis on Lincoln High School’s Hallway Hangers and Brothers programs. The Universal Declaration of Human Rights was created to ensure that all individuals, including children, are entitled to basic freedoms regardless of where they reside in the world.

In order for these rights to become reality, everyone must be aware of them and work together to make sure they are met.

One book that discusses these issues in depth is Ain’t No Makin’ It by Jay MacLeod. The book focuses on two groups of boys from different socio-economic backgrounds who attend the same high school. The Hallway Hangers are a group of lower-class boys who generally do not succeed in school, while the Brothers are a group of higher-class boys who are successful both academically and socially.

MacLeod argues that the main reason for the difference in outcomes is due to the different expectations each group has. The Hallway Hangers do not believe they can achieve anything more than what they have already experienced, while the Brothers believe they can achieve anything they set their minds to.

This book is important because it shows that everyone has the potential to succeed if they have the right mindset. It also demonstrates the importance of education in breaking the cycle of poverty. By providing equal opportunities for all, we can ensure that everyone has a chance to reach their full potential.

Both documents emphatically state that education is a fundamental and essential right for all. I believe the United States falls short in delivering on the educational rights outlined in these crucial declarations after reading this book. The Brothers and Hallway Hangers were not given an education that fostered tolerance, motivated students to attend, or accorded with equality.

The book Ain’t No Makin’ It by Jay MacLeod, is about two groups of young boys living in the projects in Asheville, North Carolina. The book goes into great detail about the difference in how each group of boys are raised and the obstacles they face daily.

Despite having similar upbringings and living in the same area, the Brothers and Hallway Hangers lead very different lives. The Brothers have high aspirations and are determined to make something of themselves, while the Hallway Hangers have resigned themselves to a life of poverty and violence. One major difference between the two groups is their attitude towards education. The Brothers see education as a way out of poverty, while the Hallway Hangers do not see the point in going to school.

The book does an excellent job of highlighting the many ways in which the education system in the United States is failing its citizens. Brothers and Hallway Hangers were both raised in poverty, but their attitudes towards education could not be more different. The Brothers see education as a way to improve their lives, while the Hallway Hangers do not see the point in going to school. This is just one example of how the education system is failing to provide equal opportunities for all students.

Ain’t No Makin’ It by Jay MacLeod is an important book that shines a light on the many ways in which the United States education system is falling short. The book provides a detailed look at how two groups of young boys from the same area can have such different attitudes towards education. This book is a must-read for anyone who wants to understand the many challenges facing the education system in the United States.

In Ain’t No Makin’ It’s Hallway Hangers chapter, The Teacher’s Nightmare, we learn that all of the Hallway Hangers had truancy issues and skipped school frequently in favor of getting high and hanging out with their friend’s. What most surprised me was that Boo-Boo once missed four months of school but there was no attempt by the institution to contact him or his parents during that period (MacLeod, 2008).

While I commend the fact that these youngsters were clearly not a pleasant task for the teachers, they nevertheless failed to try to keep them at school or get them back after they had truanted. It seems like such an important part of a child’s development, especially for these kids who did not have much going for them at home, that the school would make more of an effort.

In the book Ain’t No Makin’ It by Jay MacLeod, we learn about the struggles of growing up in poverty. The book focuses on two groups of boys, the Hallway Hangers and the Brothers. The Hallway Hangers are a group of boys who regularly skip school and get into trouble, while the Brothers are a group of boys who stay in school and try to make something of themselves.

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