Monstrosity In Frankenstein

Frankenstein is a novel written by Mary Shelley. The novel Frankenstein is about a man who creates a monster. The monster is created by using the body parts of dead people. Frankenstein’s monster is rejected by society because he is different. Frankenstein’s monster is also rejected by Frankenstein himself. Frankenstein’s monster then goes on a rampage, killing people. In the end, Frankenstein’s monster is destroyed by Frankenstein himself.

The theme of monstrosity in Frankenstein is that difference leads to rejection and that rejection leads to violence. Frankenstein’s monster is different from other people because he is made from the body parts of dead people. This difference leads to his rejection from society. Frankenstein’s monster then turns to violence because he feels rejected and alone. In the end, Frankenstein’s monster is destroyed because of the violence he has committed.

The theme of monstrosity in Frankenstein shows that difference can lead to violence and that rejection can lead to destruction. Frankenstein’s monster is a prime example of this theme. Frankenstein’s monster is different from other people, which leads to his rejection from society. Frankenstein’s monster then turns to violence because he feels rejected and alone. In the end, Frankenstein’s monster is destroyed by Frankenstein himself because of the violence he has committed.

Monsters are made up by people. People’s fears, concerns, and anxieties have been utilized to create fictional monsters. Monsters have characteristics that society considers frightening or wrong. The novel Frankenstein by Mary Shelley and the novella The Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka are two stories about a ‘monster’ pushed away from society and labeled as an outcast. The monster in these novels was not always a monster.

Frankenstein’s monster is created by Victor Frankenstein. Frankenstein uses different parts from cadavers to create his monster. The creature that Frankenstein creates is big and ugly. He has no hair and his skin is green. He also has yellow eyes that glow in the dark. Frankenstein’s monster is a physical representation of what people are afraid of. The fact that he was created by stitching different body parts together makes him a scary creature.

Frankenstein’s monster is dangerous because he was created to be powerful and strong. He can kill people with his bare hands. However, Frankenstein’s monster is not always a monster. He is capable of love and kindness. He saves a little girl from drowning and he feels remorse for killing people. Frankenstein’s monster is only a monster because society made him one. He is rejected by Victor Frankenstein and by society. People are scared of him because he is different.

Frankenstein’s monster is a victim of circumstance. In The Metamorphosis, Gregor Samsa wakes up one day to find that he has turned into a giant bug. His family is disgusted by him and they can’t stand to look at him. They reject him and treat him like a pest. They lock him in his room and throw food at him. Gregor is forced to live in his room, away from the rest of the world. He becomes isolated and lonely.

Gregor is a victim of circumstance. He did not ask to be turned into a bug. He is forced to live in isolation because his family can’t stand to look at him. Gregor is only a monster because society made him one. Frankenstein’s monster and Gregor Samsa are both victims of circumstance. They are both rejected by society and treated like monsters. Frankenstein’s monster is only a monster because he looks different.

Both Frankenstein’s monster and Gregor went to monstrosity when society deemed them perverse. Both instances illustrate how monsters are made, not born. It is not the nature of a creature to be a monster that causes him to become one; it is the abuse he suffers that drives him to do so. The mistreatment he receives is due to his appearance. From the moment he opened his eyes, people regarded him as a horrible monster.

He was gentle, loving, and had the potential to be a great friend. Frankenstein’s creature only wanted to be loved, but instead he was pushed away and hurt. In the end, this is what made him a monster.

Similarly, in the story “The Metamorphosis” by Franz Kafka, Gregor Samsa wakes up one day to find himself transformed into a giant insect. Like Frankenstein’s monster, Gregor is also treated poorly because of his appearance. His family is disgusted by him and they can no longer stand to look at him. They stop talking to him and start pushing him away. Gregor eventually becomes so isolated that he dies. The lack of love and compassion from his family is what turns Gregor into a monster.

Both Frankenstein’s creature and Gregor Samsa are victims of their appearance. They are both pushed away and hurt because of the way they look. The lack of love and compassion from those around them is what turns them into monsters. Frankenstein’s creature and Gregor Samsa serve as examples of how monsters are created, not born.

Victor’s creation was innocent, perplexed, and terrified, just like a newborn baby that humans take care of and are fiercely protective of. According to the monster, the childlike state he was in was “No distinct ideas occupied my mind; all was confused.”

Frankenstein’s creature was born into a world where he was automatically seen as a monster, an “abortion”, and something that should never have been created. Frankenstein is the one who gave him those characteristics by not accepting him and running away in fear.

The creature did everything he could to try and become accepted by humans, but it was all for nothing. In the end, Frankenstein’s abandonment of his creature led to the creature’s abandonment of Frankenstein’s loved ones, which in turn caused Frankenstein to track down and kill the creature.

Frankenstein is responsible for the deaths of many people, including his own family, because he abandoned his creation. The novel Frankenstein can be seen as a cautionary tale about the dangers of science and ambition. Frankenstein’s desire to create life leads to death and destruction. Frankenstein is a story about the dangers of playing with nature and the consequences that come with it.

After Victor abandoned his creation, this boyish creature was exposed to the harsh world. Hunger, intense heat, and a lack of knowledge about what he was feeling were all problems the creature had to deal with. If he had received comfort and care or exhibited any sort of charming treatment, the monster would not have learned to despise people for being rejected.

Yes, he would have been an outcast; however, it would have been less difficult since he would’ve had someone to turn to. The monster turned towards his anger and isolation after losing his support system, then moved on to seek revenge.

Frankenstein is the story of a creature that is rejected by its creator and, as a result, turns to evil. The theme of monstrosity in Frankenstein can be seen in both the monster and Victor. The monster is ugly and feared by everyone who sees him. He is an outcast because of his appearance. Victor Frankenstein is also monstrous because he abandons his creation. He does not take responsibility for the monster and leaves him to fend for himself. As a result, the monster learns to hate people and turns to revenge.

The theme of monstrosity is also seen in the way that Frankenstein treats his wife, Elizabeth. He neglects her and does not show her the love and attention she needs. This causes her to feel like a monster herself. Frankenstein is more interested in his experiments than he is in her.

The theme of monstrosity is present throughout Frankenstein and helps to create a sense of horror in the novel. Mary Shelley uses this theme to explore the idea of what it means to be a monster. Is it our appearance that makes us monsters, or is it our actions? Frankenstein shows us that it is possible for both the creature and Victor Frankenstein to be monstrous.

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