Thou Blind Man’s Mark Analysis

Thou Blinds Man Mark is a poem written by Sir Philip Sidney. The poem is about a man who is blind and cannot see the beauty in life. The man is also unable to see the love that others have for him. Thou Blinds Man Mark is a beautiful poem that speaks to the heart and soul of everyone who reads it. Sir Philip Sidney was a masterful poet and his work continues to inspire people today. Thou Blinds Man Mark is one poem that should not be missed.

The poem is about a man who is blind and cannot see the beauty around him. The poem is written in iambic pentameter and has a regular rhyme scheme. Thou Blinds Man Mark is a Petrarchan sonnet and follows the typical structure of an Italian sonnet.

The first eight lines (the octave) are about the problem, and the last six lines (the sestet) are about the resolution. In this case, the problem is that the man is blind and cannot appreciate the beauty around him. The resolution is that even though he cannot see, he can still feel and appreciate the beauty through touch.

Thou Blinds Man Mark is a beautiful poem that speaks to the human condition. It is a reminder that even though we may not be able to see everything, we can still appreciate the beauty in life.

The poem ‘Thou Blind Man’s Mark’ by Sir Philip Sidney depicts desire and the road to ruin it leads to. The speaker’s harsh attitude towards want can be linked with his follies, as well as the calamities that his desires have caused him, in which he apologises for his stupidity.

The poem is written in Petrarchan sonnet form, which consists of an octave (8 lines) and a sestet (6 lines), and it employs the rhyme scheme abbaabba cdcdee. The first eight lines establish the speaker’s problem: his inability to see what he wants and his growing frustration. In the octave, the speaker presents two main images that illustrate his blindness.

The first image is of a man who wanders around with a torch “lighted at both ends”(2). The light represents knowledge, or awareness, and the fact that it is lit at both ends signifies that the man has none. The second image is of a man walking in circles, “beating the air” (6). This image suggests that the speaker is wasting his time and effort on something that will not yield any results.

The sestet presents the speaker’s solution to his problem: he must give up his desire. The first two lines of the sestet, “Thou blind man’s mark! Thou fool’s self-chosen snare!” (9-10), state the speaker’s opinion of desire in general. He believes that it is a trap that one sets for oneself, and that it is ultimately foolish.

The next two lines, “Fond fancy’s staring eyes doth dazzle so / That it makes all it looks on bright and clear” (11-12), explain the speaker’s specific experience with desire. He is so blinded by what he wants that he cannot see anything else. The final two lines, “And were it not for shame, Thou wouldst be shent / To wish for what Thou art not like to earn” (13-14), express the speaker’s regret. He is ashamed of his desire because it is something that he knows he cannot have.

Sir Philip Sidney’s poem, “Thou Blind Man’s Mark,” criticizes desire by illustrating the path of destruction that it leads to. The speaker begins by describing how desire makes one blind and leads to frustration. He then proceeds to regretfully state how one should be ashamed of desiring something that they cannot have. In this way, Sidney shows that desire is not only foolish, but also dangerous.

People become insane as a result of desire. The speaker’s tone is similar to that of the poem; both express anger. Sidney creates tone with his use of language and literary devices. He resorts to figures of speech, irony, and mixed metaphors in order to express his feelings on the subject of desire.

The first stanza opens with the personification of desire as a “tyrant.” The speaker applies human characteristics to desire in order to show how it can take control over someone’s mind. The use of the word “tyrant” also suggests that the speaker is not in control of their feelings.

This is further shown through the use of diction in the second line, where the speaker says that desire “blinds” them. The word “blind” has both a literal and figurative meaning. It literal sense, it means that the person cannot see what is happening around them. In a figurative sense, it means that the person cannot see reason or logic; they are under the spell of desire.

The third stanza is where the speaker really begins to show their feelings of anger and frustration. The use of the word “slave” in the first line is significant because it shows how desire has taken control of the speaker. They are no longer in control of their own actions; they are under the control of desire.

The first three lines of the poem include paradox and irony. The line, “Thou blind man’s mark, thou fool’s self-chosen trap…” reflects Sidney’s ridiculous idea of desire. Because he wanted to emphasize the feeling of desire’s intricacies, Sidiends the poem in this way.

The use of “snare” suggests that desire can be something that catches us off guard. This is significant because it sets up the speaker’s conflict within the poem. The speaker is both attracted and repelled by desire.

The next two lines, “Fond fancy’s jetsam, Thou whose frenzy­-fit / Hath left thee wrecked on ruinous rocks of lust…” continue to develop the speaker’s negative view of desire. The word “fancy” suggests that the speaker sees desire as something manufactured by the mind. This is significant because it devalues desire as something false or unreal. The phrase “lustful rocks” suggests that the speaker sees desire as something destructive. This is significant because it emphasizes the speaker’s conflict. The speaker is attracted to desire, but sees it as something dangerous.

The final line of the poem, “Thou art time’s trophy, Thou art world’s scandal…” reflects the speaker’s ambivalent attitude towards desire. The word “trophy” suggests that the speaker sees desire as something to be conquered or overcome. This is significant because it suggests that the speaker does not see desire as an inherent bad thing. The word “scandal” suggests that the speaker sees desire as something to be ashamed of. This is significant because it highlights the speaker’s conflict. The speaker is attracted to desire, but sees it as something to be ashamed of.

In conclusion, Thou Blinds Man Mark by Sir Philip Sidney is a poem that explores the speaker’s ambivalent attitude towards desire. The speaker is attracted to desire, but sees it as something dangerous and destructive. The poem reflects the complicated nature of desire and its ability to both attract and repel us.

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